PREGNANCY

5 Things Moms Should Avoid During Pregnancy with Dr Samantha Radford from Evidence-based Mommy

In this episode of The Pulling Curls Podcast: Pregnancy & Parenting Untangled, host Hilary Erickson interviews Samantha Radford about 5 things to avoid during pregnancy. They discuss the importance of using low VOC paint or having someone else do the painting in the nursery. They also talk about the risks associated with lead paint in older homes and provide tips on how to safely deal with it. This episode offers practical advice for pregnant women to minimize chemical exposures during pregnancy.

Big thanks to our sponsor my Safe Eating during pregnancy guide. Get it right here:

Featured Image

Today’s guest is Samantha Radford:

Samantha Radford has a PhD in Chemistry from Emory University (Atlanta, GA). She is an exposure scientist who focuses on maternal-child health. Samantha has years of research into learning about how chemical exposures affect both unborn babies and children, as well as how toxicants and medications are passed through breastmilk.

Samantha also studies the effect of exposure to hormones induced by personal experiences, for example, cortisol in babies who are stressed or oxytocin in mothers bonding to their infants.

Through the years, Samantha has expanded her academic and personal studies to how exposures to different parenting styles affect the mental and physical health of children as they grow to adulthood.

Most importantly, Samantha is a busy mother of four kids 7 and under. She loves to empower other moms through combining science and wellness.

Samantha has been trying to bring back the banana clip since 1998.

Grab her Registry guide here: https://deft-writer-5597.ck.page/e2540098de

Samantha has been on a few other episodes:

Links for you:

Timestamps:

00:00:00 Avoid 5 things during pregnancy; introducing Samantha.
00:06:08 Beware of lead paint; hire a professional.
00:10:11 Baby safety: watch for lead and mercury.
00:12:25 Bioaccumulation: mercury in fish from contaminated plankton.
00:16:41 Deli meat risk: commercialized vs. fresh cut.
00:20:27 Choose organic foods to avoid pesticides while pregnant.
00:22:31 Avoid sanding lead paint; eat smaller fish and organic produce.
00:24:50 Enjoyed episode on avoiding pregnancy risks. Review/share/subscribe.

Keypoints:

  1. Introduction to the topic: “5 Things for Mom to Avoid During Pregnancy”
  2. Introducing guest Samantha Radford and her expertise in chemistry and parenting.
  3. Sponsor mention: My Safe Eating Guide for real advice on pregnancy nutrition.
  4. Discussing the misconception of avoiding hot Cheetos and other specific foods during pregnancy.
  5. Highlighting the importance of avoiding certain paints during pregnancy and opting for low VOC options.
  6. Explaining the risks of lead paint in older homes and the need to avoid sanding or disturbing it.
  7. Mentioning the option of encapsulation to safely cover lead paint if repainting is desired.
  8. Samantha’s personal preference of not having a nursery and the alternative of using a bassinet in the parent’s room.
  9. Discussion on the importance of creating a safe and healthy environment for both mom and baby during pregnancy.
  10. Recap and closing thoughts on the importance of focusing on what can be controlled during pregnancy.

Producer: Drew Erickson

Transcript
[00:00:00.140] – Hilary Erickson

Hey guys. Welcome back to the Pulling Curls Podcast. Today on episode 209, we are talking about five things that you should avoid during pregnancy. Let’s untangle it.

[00:00:08.800] – Hilary Erickson

Hi, I’m Hilary, a serial overcomplicator. I’m also a nurse, mom to three, and the curly head behind Pulling Curls and the pregnancy nurse. This podcast aims to help us stop overcomplicating things and remember how much easier it is to keep things simple. Let’s smooth out those snarls with pregnancy and parenting untangled, The Pulling Curls Podcast.

[00:00:44.800] – Hilary Erickson

Okay, guys. Today’s guest has actually been on the podcast several times. She has a PhD in Chemistry from Emory, and she is the mommy behind Evidence-based Mommy. By the way, you guys, she has such a great registry item. Stay tuned for what she shares at the end. I want to introduce today’s guest, Samantha Radford.

[00:01:02.340] – Hilary Erickson

This episode of The Pulling Curls Podcast, Pregnancy and Parenting Untabled, is sponsored by my safe eating guide. If you’re wondering what you can eat and can’t eat and want to see some real advice from someone who knows rather than social media, check it out. You can find it under Resources at the Pregnancy Nurse or I’ll put the link in the show notes.

[00:01:20.300] – Hilary Erickson

Hey, Samantha. Welcome back to The Pulling Curls Podcast.

[00:01:23.560] – Samantha Radford

Hey, Hilary. So good to be here with you today.

[00:01:26.340] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah, you’re so popular. I’m excited to have you back on because I write about all the silly things people think they should avoid during pregnancy, like hot Cheetos or ranch dressing.

[00:01:36.710] – Samantha Radford

I need to hear the Hot Cheetos.

[00:01:38.790] – Hilary Erickson

I need to hear that. Apparently, people google, If I eat Hot Cheetos, will it hurt my baby’s ears? I guess because it’s so loud? I don’t know.

[00:01:47.250] – Samantha Radford

But aren’t other Cheetos just as crunchy?

[00:01:49.620] – Hilary Erickson

I figure chips are just as crunchy. I don’t think they’re the pretzels. I don’t know. But I think I just said no, probably not.

[00:01:59.460] – Samantha Radford

Okay.

[00:01:59.750] – Hilary Erickson

Anyway, so today we’re going to talk about some actual things you should avoid during your pregnancy with Samantha, who knows all about chemicals and hot Cheetos maybe. I don’t know. Do you know much about.

[00:02:10.460] – Samantha Radford

Hot Cheetos? I’ve never tried hot Cheetos. I do like regular Cheetos. Cheetos are one of those things that I don’t usually want, but if I have one, then I need the whole bag.

[00:02:19.720] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. It’s a gateway drug for me.

[00:02:21.890] – Samantha Radford

Yes, indeed. This is fun because I actually just started my own podcast a few months ago, so it’s nice to get to do this with someone else. Hilary is going to be my very first guest. I know. So we’re going to be trading episodes. Super excited.

[00:02:37.860] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. Let’s dive into what people should be avoiding during pregnancy.

[00:02:42.660] – Samantha Radford

Yeah. We talked about before, this is one of those things that is hard for me to talk about, because some of the stuff are things that you can’t control. So you can’t control just either because it’s all around you, or because you’d have to get into a time machine and change some things you did before. But we want to focus on the present and what we can control now and not stress about those other things that we can’t control.

[00:03:13.630] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. Like tearing at delivery, I’m like, Yeah, you should only have sex with guys who have tiny shoulders. Time machine. Nobody has one.

[00:03:22.570] – Samantha Radford

Right. Oh, man. Okay, so moving on from that. The first thing that I thought of is a lot of times, especially with the first baby, you want to make the cute little nursery, and you want to make it look just perfect and all of that. And if you’re wanting to repaint, let someone else do it.

[00:03:44.450] – Hilary Erickson

Okay. So any paint probably to avoid?

[00:03:48.000] – Samantha Radford

Yeah. Ideally, you would use the low VOC. Sometimes they call it no VOC. Voc means volatile organic chemical, by the way. So basically, if you can smell something, that means that it’s volatile because it’s up into the air. Okay. So, of course, for a nursery, you want to use something that’s low VOC anyways. But anything you can do to minimize your exposures to those kinds of chemicals would be great. So let your partner do the painting, have a friend come over, something like that. Try not to be the one doing the painting. And then open up the windows and let it air out for a while after that.

[00:04:26.930] – Hilary Erickson

Okay, that’s helpful. I’ve heard that it’s okay to do, I don’t know, is it latex? Like one is better than the other for people to paint with? Is that true? Not really.

[00:04:36.830] – Samantha Radford

Yeah. I would have to look at the specifics. There are certain brands that call themselves low VOC, and they actually do have less of the most toxic stuff. You don’t want to use an oil-based, which is more an outdoor paint. Now, when I was pregnant with my first, I used acrylic paints. We painted the whole room, but then I also used acrylics to paint a little tree. I did do that myself. I think that’s okay because that’s more water-based.

[00:05:08.210] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. Well, and you’re not doing a whole wall. Maybe that’s different, too.

[00:05:11.690] – Samantha Radford

Yeah, that’s true. It’s not like this big can. When you open up a can of paint, that hits you like a brick wall. You smell it.

[00:05:19.530] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. I like the idea of not painting personally.

[00:05:22.880] – Samantha Radford

I do, too. Honestly, I do, too. What I really like while we’re at it, I like not having a nursery. I like get a little bassinet and have that in your room and be done with it. After the first kid, I didn’t do the nursery thing again, but I get that it’s cute and exciting and happy.

[00:05:43.180] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. Well, and you do sometimes… You do sometimes need area to store their clothes because you’ve taken up all the spots. I didn’t have any money to make a fancy nursery with my first one, so we were lucky to have a crib. That’s where we were.

[00:05:55.450] – Samantha Radford

Right. Then, eventually also, I guess, they’ll need their own room one day. But do what works for your family. Yeah.

[00:06:04.990] – Hilary Erickson

Okay, paint. Good. I don’t like to paint, so check mark.

[00:06:08.360] – Samantha Radford

Cool. And speaking of painting, if you live in a home, this is number two, by the way. Okay. If you live in a home that was built before the early ’80s, watch out for lead paint. So the reason I say the early ’80s is because lead was removed from paint in 1978. You weren’t allowed to put lead and paint anymore at that time. However, I can imagine contractors just having some extra paint laying around.

[00:06:40.290] – Hilary Erickson

So.

[00:06:41.560] – Samantha Radford

That’s why I give that couple of year buffer. I’m not saying that you can’t live in a house older than that, but if you are in a home older than that, there are things you need to do to make sure that you avoid lead exposure, because that is especially important for you and your child. If you’re going to repaint, well, not you, your partner or somebody. If somebody’s going to repaint, let them do it. And don’t try to sand first, because I’ve heard horror stories of a family that found out like, Oh, my 1950s home has lead paint.

[00:07:19.100] – Samantha Radford

They freaked out, and they sanded the walls to take it off. And that is the absolute worst thing you can do, because what happens then is now you’ve created all this lead dust that’s just in the air. The exposure is way worse than if you just left that paint there. So it’s called encapsulation. If you just paint over it, that’s a lot safer. If you do desperately want to get the lead paint out of your home, which I totally understand, you would need a contractor specifically licensed to do that, and it would be way more expensive, but they would know how to do that safely.

[00:07:53.540] – Hilary Erickson

Okay. Isn’t there a way to check if you have lead paint?

[00:07:57.780] – Samantha Radford

So they make these strips. I’ve heard that sometimes they are more accurate than others, but it’s like if you wet them and then rub on the paint and then put that on the strip, it’s supposed to turn pink if there’s lead in there. I do not know about the accuracy. I actually, when we very first moved up here to Pennsylvania, gosh, it’s been almost nine years now, the first place we lived in was old, maybe the 20s when it was built, 1920s.

[00:08:28.080] – Samantha Radford

I just realized we have to differentiate now. And it’s been three years we’ve had to do that. So anyways, we were living there, and that had never crossed my mind. Lead had never crossed my mind just because it wasn’t something that I had to deal with where I grew up.

[00:08:46.620] – Samantha Radford

One of our dogs chewed on a windowsill, and then she died not very long after that. I was teaching because before this, I was a professor of analytical chemistry. I was teaching chemistry, and we were doing an analytical chemistry class. That’s basically how much of what chemical is in this thing is what we’re figuring out how to find out.

[00:09:11.680] – Samantha Radford

I was like, Oh, let me get some of this paint for you all to test. There’s a whole way you can do it. You dissolve the paint and then you put it through this machine. And it was like, I don’t know, 15 or 20 % lead, something insane, huge amounts of lead.

[00:09:29.540] – Samantha Radford

I’ve gotten to where because I’ve seen so much of it, because there’s so much of it where I am. I can look at old paint, and I can almost tell just by looking because it has this very specific crackly… The way it degrades over time, it chips, which they talk about not letting your kid eat paint chips. So you were going back to latex. Latex paint wouldn’t chip like that.

[00:09:54.210] – Hilary Erickson

Okay. I don’t think it’s a bad idea too if you have a question to buy those strips, because sometimes kids will chew on the… If you have the windowsill, like the pokes out. I have seen babies because it’s a lot of times right at their eye level, and they’ll just look at it and make love to it.

[00:10:11.170] – Samantha Radford

Indeed. Now first we’re talking about head and shoulders, and now we’re talking about. It’s true, though, because when they get to nine-ish months is when they start pulling up to the stand, depending on the baby. That’s the exact right height for them to pull up on. And babies that age, they put things in their mouth because that’s what they’re supposed to do. So it’s just the perfect height for them to just knall on. And white paint tends to be the kind that would have lead in it. You could put that in any color, but basically, lead is especially good for white paint.

[00:10:44.600] – Samantha Radford

So since people tend to like to have white window seals and door frames, which again, are the best chewy spots, that’s going to be the worst for lead. It’s just all bad all the way around. So that’s actually another thing. We’ve talked about painting over to encapsulate that lead, but especially just keep an eye out for cracks around your window seals or your door frames as far as the paint goes. And if you see any cracks like that, immediately paint over and recoat that. And you’ll want to dust around that area a bit more frequently and vacuum the floors around the area or wet mop a bit more frequently to get all of that up.

[00:11:30.470] – Hilary Erickson

Okay, good advice. No lead. Got it.

[00:11:33.330] – Samantha Radford

Yes, indeed. So that was one of the heavy metals we have to be concerned about. The other one is mercury. So this is probably one you’ve already heard of, but you want to avoid eating not all fish because there’s definitely those fatty acids and stuff that are really good for your baby’s brain development and all that.

[00:11:54.010] – Samantha Radford

But if you can avoid bigger fish, so fish like shark or swordfish, or king mackerel, those that are up at the top of the food chain, those are the ones that you want to avoid so that you can avoid mercury exposure. You may have heard of something called bioaccumulation when you were taking chemistry or biology way back when. Have you heard of that, Hilary?

[00:12:20.890] – Hilary Erickson

We didn’t accumulate things when I went to school in the ’90s. I don’t recall that at all.

[00:12:25.680] – Samantha Radford

Okay. That’s nice to know. That’s one of those things I’m like, Everybody knows bioaccumulation because I’m in my crazy little silo. So the idea is, let’s say, I guess the lowest level would be like plankton or something. So let’s say that there’s some plankton, and there’s mercury, and they’re just from fallout from smoke and stuff from industrial processes.

[00:12:52.580] – Samantha Radford

So if you have little plankton that have some mercury in them just from being exposed to it, then like a little fish eats the plankton. Then the little fish has some mercury in it. And the little fish is going to eat a bunch of plankton. And all those plankton are going to deposit mercury in it. And the mercury does not leave the fish. It’s just stuck in there. It doesn’t pass out of it.

[00:13:17.700] – Samantha Radford

And so then that little fish gets eaten by a bigger fish. And that bigger fish eats a bunch of different little fishes. So it has even more mercury in it. And then the biggest fish, like the shark or whatever, eats lots of those medium-sized fish. And so basically, the higher up the food chain you go, those chemicals that are toxic, they’re more concentrated inside the fish flesh that you eat. Does that make sense?

[00:13:46.040] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah, that does make sense.

[00:13:47.910] – Samantha Radford

Okay. Yeah. So if you eat smaller fish, you will be getting less of those toxic things. And of course, you’ll still get the advantages of the DHA and all that, like the fatty acids that are so great for your baby’s brain development, which is good.

[00:14:03.800] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. Okay, that’s good, because I think a lot of people just avoid fish in general. Like no tuna, no salmon. So it’s good to know why you should just avoid. I don’t know. Those other fishes are usually too expensive for the Erickson family.

[00:14:18.440] – Samantha Radford

Yeah, I know. I get that. And even with tuna, if you get a big tuna steak, like that’s obviously a bigger tuna, they use the smaller, less awesome fish to make the canned tuna for your tuna salad or whatever. Right. So you’re actually better off getting canned tuna than you are a big tuna steak just because it’s a smaller fish that was used to make it.

[00:14:43.690] – Hilary Erickson

Okay. Good info.

[00:14:45.420] – Samantha Radford

Yeah. Fun fact with my third pregnancy, I wanted tuna salad all the time, but I think the craving was actually mayonnaise because I wanted extra mayonnaise on my tuna salad, which is super gross, but totallyunrelated, just we were talking about fish.

[00:15:02.920] – Hilary Erickson

I do love mayonnaise, though. I’m on board with that.

[00:15:05.620] – Samantha Radford

Yeah. And of course, like you said, some people just avoid all fish. We don’t have to do that. Do avoid raw fish. So if you’re a sushi person, now is not the time, unfortunately.

[00:15:20.030] – Hilary Erickson

Or you can have the California… Is it? Yeah. Like the Philly, where it’s cucumber, cream cheese.

[00:15:26.840] – Samantha Radford

Yes, that’s totally fine. You can’t do the raw fish. And that’s more of a bacteria thing than it is a chemical thing. But bacteria is important, too. Another one that you may or may not have heard of is cold deli meat. Like I said, the third one, I was obsessed with mayonaise on all my sandwiches. The fourth kid, I wanted a turkey sandwich so freaking bad. But I knew the recommendation is not to eat deli meat.

[00:15:57.880] – Samantha Radford

And what’s interesting, this goes back to the thing that you think would be better actually is worse. There’s a couple of things you can do. Like if you’re bound to determine you really want deli meat, the reason that they say you can’t have it is because a particular bacteria called Listeria, and if you get sick with it, I think it can actually cause your child to be stillborn, right? And it’s actually worse in the third trimester.

[00:16:22.410] – Hilary Erickson

The problem is it can pass through to the baby. So the baby gets the listeria infection too rarely. It doesn’t always happen if you get a listeria infection. No. And this is all pretty darn rare, just so everybody knows, but it can happen, and so it’s easily avoided or heated up.

[00:16:40.980] – Samantha Radford

Exactly. Yeah. It’s one of those things where it’s rare, but also is worth it to avoid. Anywho, as far as Listeria goes, it is more likely to be… So you know how you can either get the Oscar Mayer or whoever, whatever brand over in the fridge case, like with dairy and all that stuff, or you can get the nice deli meat over in the deli case that they’ve cut up for you.

[00:17:08.960] – Samantha Radford

So it’s actually less safe. Again, it’s all rare either way, but it’s less safe to go to the deli case and get your deli meat there just because it’s less commercialized and processed because they’re doing it right there. So it’s more likely that would be an issue at that last point as far as contamination goes, than in a place that’s been sterilized and it’s all very regimented, like whenever they pack it at the factory or whatever.

[00:17:45.790] – Samantha Radford

But like you said, there’s easy ways to avoid it. You could do go the tuna salad route like I did if you’re just wanting the sandwich more. But if it’s really killing you like you want turkey or ham or salami or whatever, you can heat it up either in a pan real quick or in the microwave.

[00:18:03.510] – Samantha Radford

The official temperature is 165 degrees Fahrenheit, but it’s very hard to take the temperature of one slice of turkey. I’m like, How are you supposed to know that? But they say if it’s steaming hot, that’s how you know it’s hot enough to have killed Listeria and you’re good.

[00:18:23.660] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. Which I was like, I wonder if heating up your Subway sandwich is enough. I was thinking that if I was pregnant, I’d probably ask them to heat it twice, something like that. Because I don’t know that just toasted sandwich is enough to heat up the deli meat enough. Personally, that’s just my personal opinion.

[00:18:43.540] – Samantha Radford

I agree with that. I know that they’ve got the little microwave. If you get bacon there, how they’ll heat up the bacon real quick, maybe you could ask them to do the deli meat separate. In fact, I think I did that with the fourth kid because, like I said, just really wanted turkey sandwiches all the time. So they can heat that up separately. And then if you want it toasted too, you can.

[00:19:06.420] – Hilary Erickson

That’s smart. Yeah.

[00:19:07.820] – Samantha Radford

Yes. So that’s how I did it. Firehouse subs, I don’t know if you all have those out in Arizona. We do. But oh, man, it’s amazing. Anyways, they like steam their sandwiches, so that should be good, I would think.

[00:19:21.620] – Hilary Erickson

Okay. My son works at a sandwich shop. I should figure this out with him. It’s a delicious one. Yeah, that’s an important one that I think a lot of people just ignore and they don’t exactly know why. They think it’s food poisoning, right? But listeria is way more than regular food poisoning.

[00:19:38.440] – Hilary Erickson

You’re more likely to get listeria when you’re pregnant than then passing it on to the baby, which is even worse than E. Coli, because we all know about raw chicken. None of us are out there eating raw chicken because of E. Coli, but that actually doesn’t pass to the baby. That would be just you getting dehydrated would be the problem with something like that.

[00:19:55.440] – Samantha Radford

Right. I see this is why it’s nice to talk to a nurse who actually deals with this because you know that side.

[00:20:04.070] – Hilary Erickson

Two things I also learned, beef jerky is also in the same category because it is actually not heated. It’s dried. There is still a chance of listeria, and that would be like your slim gyms, your beef jerky, any of those. I thought that was interesting, too. I know a lot of people are worried about the nitrites. The FDA doesn’t mention that at all. There you go.

[00:20:27.780] – Samantha Radford

That’s a whole other that goes back into the chemical territory. So if you can manage to get the nitrite free, that would be better. And then the last thing, since we’re on food, is thinking about, again, some of the best foods for us, like spinach, and strawberries and kale, especially when you’re pregnant. The nutrients that’s in there are just amazing for you.

[00:20:52.350] – Samantha Radford

Unfortunately, those are the foods that, when they’re grown conventionally, have the most pesticides. So if you can- they’re called the dirty dozen. The environmental working group puts out this list every year that pretty much stays the same every year, but it’s the list of the top 12 types of produce, fruits and vegetables that have the most pesticides in them. So if you can manage to get those particular things organic, at least while you’re pregnant, that will do a lot to avoid pesticides.

[00:21:24.120] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. Definitely check out that list, you guys, because some of the ones that I was like, Well, that’s probably bad, aren’t on that list. If you just stick to those 12, I think your grocery budget can stay reasonable and you can still eat. Because organic strawberries are getting cheaper, I feel like, than they used to be.

[00:21:41.360] – Samantha Radford

I don’t know. Maybe I’m. Or maybe everything else raised so much that now the differential, you’re like, That’s not so bad.

[00:21:47.020] – Hilary Erickson

But still eat the whole rainbow when you’re pregnant. It’s going to help benefit you and the baby because that baby will just take whatever it wants from you and your bones. It will eat you.

[00:21:57.710] – Samantha Radford

It’s true. Because we were talking about lead and calcium. The baby literally leaches calcium out of your bones when you’re pregnant to make it self, I guess. So lots of calcium. If you’re not getting it in your diet, it’ll just suck the life out of your bones for real.

[00:22:18.720] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. I can’t tell you how many friends I have who’ve had several babies who literally are probably going to need dentures. I don’t know. I’m like, Another cavity? You’re going to the dentist again? Wow. So, yeah, keep eating all the good things.

[00:22:31.090] – Samantha Radford

Yes. So, yeah, those are our five things. So avoiding… Let’s see. Let’s get it all. Letting someone else do the painting. Don’t sand your walls if you think you have lead paint. Just paint over it. Avoid the larger fish, but eat the smaller fish. Heat up your deli meat if you’re going to have deli meat, and avoid the dirty dozen unless you get it organic, but also eat all the different fruits and vegetables.

[00:22:58.910] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. All right. Awesome. I’m going to plug in for wine or alcohol because I just did a research subject on it. Oh, yeah. I don’t honestly know how bad it is in very tiny consumption, but I will say that every single agency says no amount of alcohol is safe. Drinking alcohol, not rubbing alcohol. You should never drink-.

[00:23:19.030] – Samantha Radford

Don’t drink that either. It’s so obvious that I forgot to say-.

[00:23:23.400] – Hilary Erickson

But they did say that 30 % of women drink during their pregnancy. It was a number of… Maybe 30 is too high, but it was 10, 20, I don’t know, something in there. But let me just put a plug in. If you’re considering drinking during pregnancy, talk with your provider about you and your needs. But yeah.

[00:23:39.190] – Samantha Radford

There you go. And smoking while we’re doing the super obvious. Please don’t. And vaping also, which is a whole other… Anyways.

[00:23:46.300] – Hilary Erickson

Okay. Those ones do seem obvious versus mercury and fish. Yeah.

[00:23:50.540] – Samantha Radford

That’s true. But since we’re saying it, yeah, let’s say it.

[00:23:53.340] – Hilary Erickson

All right. Thanks for coming on, Samantha.

[00:23:56.350] – Samantha Radford

Yeah. And then two, if you want to continue this whole non-toxic journey for your child, I have a non-toxic baby registry checklist. So you can see which all brands really are non-toxic versus the ones who just pretend that they are. I’ve got that as a freebie that I have given Hilary to put in the show notes.

[00:24:18.040] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. So you can find that at my show notes, or you can just go to Evidence-based Mommy, and you can find it. Is it on your homepage?

[00:24:24.500] – Samantha Radford

It should be.

the secrets of getting prepared for your birth
[00:24:26.120] – Hilary Erickson

Or in the menu, you’ll have a freebie section. Look around or just search it on Evidence-based Mommy. Yeah, for sure. But that’s awesome because you never know, right?

[00:24:35.920] – Samantha Radford

It’s true. Yeah. There’s so much that you don’t even think about until you’ve looked at it. Yeah.

[00:24:41.940] – Hilary Erickson

Yeah. All right. Great. So definitely go check out that baby registry checklist. And Samantha, I’m sure we’ll have you on again.

[00:24:48.900] – Samantha Radford

Absolutely. I’m looking forward to it.

[00:24:50.720] – Hilary Erickson

Okay. I hope you guys enjoyed that episode. I think it can feel like there’s a lot of things that you have to avoid during pregnancy, but really, when you boil it down, there isn’t all that much beyond what you should be avoiding in regular life. Like a lot of these lead, we should be avoiding in regular life. You just have to be a little bit more extra careful when you’re pregnant. So hopefully you guys enjoyed this episode.

[00:25:11.590] – Hilary Erickson

Thanks for joining us on The Pulling Curls Podcast today. If you liked today’s episode, please consider reviewing, sharing, subscribing. It really helps our podcast grow. Thank you.

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